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20130801
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
that 2014 will be critical for us, critical for taking back the nation, and it is going to be a moment when everybody around the country can hear especially from those of us in the rocky mountain west, that we are not going to stand for it [applause] longer. one of the questions i get a lot and then i will ask my dad, because i would like to hear his view, the media in particular likes to talk about how the republican party is in disarray. we are facing these huge challenges, but we have got this disputes going on inside our party. i would like to hear you talk of about the introspective's on it, as somebody who has obviously participated in politics and policy for a long time and who has seen our party and the democratic party go through times of change. i would be interested to hear your thoughts on where the party is today and what we have got to do to take back the white house in 2016. >> after the -- obviously i was not happy about the outcome in 2008, but president bush and i had had our eight years, we had worn out our welcome in some quarters, although we are looking better and bett
example. the challenge for us as individuals like the tsarnaevs is and they do not hit our radar. they do not travel and communicate in the same way learn what they need to learn the internet and become radicalized of the internet. from that perspective, it poses a real challenge. as would brief the threat, overall, i would say it remains persistent. it is increasingly complex and diverse bit -- and diverse. >> first of all, always good to be here. thank you for another great event. i want to commend matt for the great job he has done. but also, i think people should understand modern government. it is a really big deal for a current and former to sit next to each other. a lot about matt's confidence as sit next to a guy who can say anything the hell he wants. glad to keep them close. [laughter] i agree with his assessment of the threat. i would add a couple of small items. we have actually done, would've talked about the threats and other places that are terrible in the world. we have to remember how successful the counterterrorism activities have been over the last 12 years. if i asked
, she ended up as wife of the commanding u.s. general during the civil war. she and ulysses s. grant shared 37 years together that included the hardships of war, the challenges of politics, and eight years in the white house. welcome to our program, "first ladies: influence and image." tonight, julia grant. let me introduce you to our guests. bill seale is a member of our series. he is a longtime white house historian and the author of "the president's house." pam sanfilippo is a historian at the ulysses s. grant national historic site. she is also working on a biography of julia grant. i want to start with you. we last left the series with the johnsons after impeachment and the politics with the radical republicans in reconstruction in the south. set the stage for us as the grants come into the white house. guest: well, grant's election started off with the campaign -- "let us have peace." people were really looking to grant to kind of bring some peace and quiet to the white house and to the nation after the war and the years of the johnson administration. so, those were grant's ini
in the room. complete gavel-to-gavel coverage of the u.s. house as a public house of -- as a public service of private industry. we are c-span. now, you can watch us in hd. of first ladies begins. tonight, we have an encore of the final program about ida mckinley. william mckinley. >> the story of ida mckinley can be told through an exploration between her husband william mckinley. they spent 30 years together which brought them happiness early on. it changed their life into illness and devotion to shape the presidency at the turn of the new century. joining us tonight to tell the story of ida mckinley are two guests returning to the table, richard norton smith and carl anthony. we are going to start our program with film. this is the first time that a president and first lady have been captured on film in the the united states. this rare footage is mr. and mrs. mckinley coming on stage in 1901. that date is significant because the next day the president would be shot by an assassin's bullets. what was it about this exhibition that attracted the president to want to go? >> it was a world th
come together this morning, this same promise must lead us all to acknowledge that although incarceration that is has a significant role to play in our justice system, widespread incarceration at the federal, state, and local levels is both ineffective and unsustainable. it imposes a significant economic burden, totaling $80 billion in 2010 alone, and it comes human and moral costs that are impossible to calculate. as a nation, we are goled coldly efficient in our incarceration efforts. now, while the entire u.s. population has increased by about a third since 1980, the federal prison population has grown by an astonishing rate, almost 800 percent. it is still growing, despite the fact that federal prisons are operating at nearly 40% above capacity. countryugh this comprises just 5% of the world's population, we incarcerate almost a quarter of the world's prisoners. more than 219,000 federal inmates are currently behind bars. almost half of them are serving time for drug-related crimes and many have substance use disorders. 9 million to 10 million more people cycle through a
the healthcare law for one year. then, he looks at his network latest series, in thing on inequality in the u.s. justices him. after, as manager of education we talked about, and for standards initiative and how it plays into the overall education in the u.s. "washing journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. season two of "first ladies" begins monday, september 9 with a look at the life of roosevelt. encore presentations of season one. each weeknight at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span, programs on every first lady. during tonight's encore presentation of our "first ladies" program, a story and will answer your questions about julia tyler at facebook.com/c- span. ♪ [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> she was not happy her husband had been elected president. she never made it to washington. >> when he resigned, he and his wife and their family moved here to williamsburg. it was here that letitia tyler suffered a stroke. john tyler learned he was elected as vice president of william perry region william henry har
grover cleveland. to help us understand the sensation sweeping the country, we begin our story inside 1600 pennsylvania avenue. for the first and only time in our countries history. watching frances cleveland into instant celebrity.>> this is the modern white house. it is the same basic layout as it would have been on june 2. when president grover cleveland and his bride to be came down what was then about large staircase to the family quarters at the west end of this corridor. they would have proceeded on the hallway, the music started up at the east side behind us here, where the united states marine band was assembled. the famous john philip sousa played the wedding march as the happy couple can down the hallway.-- came down the hallway. they would have passed through these doors, these very same mahogany doors.they would have come into the room, a different chandelier here, they would have stood under the chandelier. said their vows. an enormous amount of flowers in the room brought from the white house conservatory. a large table where the sofa is now is a stream of potted plants
not come to the white house, she did use her influence to get appointments for her nephews and sons and grandsons, so she would have been political in that way but not the way he would think the second person, john tyler's second wife, but at least during the time, even though she did not come to the white house, she did use her influence to get appointments for her nephews and sons and grandsons, so she would have been political in that way but not the way he would think of with someone like julia tyler. >> which we will learn more of tonight. and this comment, she must have had good genes. what was going on in the harrison family that it produced so many political leaders? >> they were one of the first families of virginia, so you would have had them be involved in the revolution. they have a long history of political involvement. i think it is where they are located by the mid 1800's in the northwest territory, in this area that is opening up in the country, and these men are getting politically involved because of its. >> our facebook page asks, is it true she helped raise her s
very modern to us today. >> john and abigail adams have become so prominent in the minds of americans because of this collection of papers. >> the story of abigail adams and the revolutionary war is the story of sacrifice, of commitment to country. abigail rose to the occasion. >> abigail was adamantly opposed to slavery. >> she was quite a behind-the- scenes dynamo. she warned her husband, you cannot rule without including what women want and what women have to contribute. >> the backdrop to the occupancy of the white house is one of political defeat and personal tragedy. >> she is worried about her husband and defends him against slander. she is concerned about her children, their upbringing, their education. >> she could hold her own with anybody in her own time and since. she was in every way her husband's equal. >> born in 1744, abigail smith married john adams at age 19. over 54 years of marriage, they had five children together, including a future president. ahead of her time in many ways, and a writer unparalleled to any first lady, she penned this to her husband during the am
at the turn of the new century. joining us tonight to tell the story of ida mckinley are two guests returning to the table, richard norton smith and carl anthony. we are going to start our program with film. this is the first time that a president and first lady have been captured on film in the the united states. this rare footage is mr. and mrs. mckinley coming on stage in 1901. that date is significant because the next day the president would be shot by an assassin's bullets. what was it about this exhibition that attracted the president to want to go? >> it was a world there. -- fair, it was a celebration of america's place in the new world. the presidency was very surprising in many ways. in fact, he was the president who took the country to the world stage. the spanish-american war and turned america into a republican into an empire. at the end of his life in the last speech he gave, in effect he talks in ways that years later we can all appreciate about opening america to the world. >> we were looking at our posting and everybody is asking about what is known of ida mckinley, her ill h
. thank you for joining us this evening. session two of first ladies and ladies, influence image begins. all this month we are showing encore presentations of season one. programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, it is doubly medicine. -- dolly madison. >> dolley was socially adept and politically savvy. >> she was his best friend. she compensated. >> james madison wishes to meet her. >> she carved out a space for women where they can wield a great deal of political power. >> dolley madison would sit at the head of the table and erect the conversation. >> she got these people to the white house and entertained them. got them together and got them talking. >> this was important to her to make everyone feel welcome. >> it was considered her classic look. people noticed it. >> it was a perfect setting for james and dolley madison >> she sat side by side with james madison helping him. >> she moved back to washington d.c. in her elder years and became very much behind the scenes in a political field again. >> as henry clay famously said, everybody loves m
's two terms. the president often called on her to assist him. this sense of the usefulness of diplomacy allowed dolley to hit the ground wanting when she assumed the role in 1809 as her husband james madison became andpresident.good evening welcome. tonight we will learn about the intriguing dolley madison. we have two guests at our table. let me introduce you to them. catherine allgor, an author and biographer of dolley madison. and a historian. one of her books is called "a perfect union." thank you for being here. edith mayo was the creator of the first lady's exhibit at the smithsonian. so many smithsonian visitors have seen this throughout the years. thank you for being here tonight. >> it is a pleasure. >> any 21st century woman who starts to read about dolley madison can see parallels to their own lives. in the way she seemed to approach her role in washington. was she, in fact, ahead of her time? a sort of modern person in the early 1800's, or not? >> that is the paradox. she was raised in a certain culture. when she became first lady, she started adopting a path that paved the
by social media, if you're on twitter you can send us a question or comment using the hash tag first ladies. and on facebook, on c-span's site we have a question posted for you of anything you'd like to talk about during martha washington's time or life, and we'll mix those into the discussion as well. we welcome your participation, that's what it's all about here. we're going to spend the first 15 or 20 minutes on the years in the white house, the two terms there. >> not the white house. >> that's right, sorry. the presidential mansion in new york city. 1789 she comes to new york city a few months behind george washington. let's start by telling us what kind of opinion the american public had of these two people as they took this important role. >> well, the opinion they had of these two had begun with the revolution, and at that point when martha would ride to join her husband as she did every year at the winter camps, there would be, people would just line up, be on every tree on every fence post to look at her. as she said, i felt as though i were a very great somebody. she was somebody
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)